The Comprehensive Jewish and Civil Calendars

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The Comprehensive Jewish and Civil Calendars 2001 to 2240


  • Corresponding Jewish and Civil Dates, 2001 to 2240
  • Weekly Torah and Haftarah Readings
  • Jewish, Civil, Federal, and Israeli Holidays
  • Fast Days, Rosh Hodesh, and Machzor Hagadol
  • Shemittah and Hakhel Years
  • Birth and Death of Moses and Rebbe
  • Ample Space for Notes and to Record Important Family Events
  • Candle-Lighting Times for Selected National and International  Cities

The Standard Guide To the Jewish and Civil Calendars

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The Standard Guide To the Jewish and Civil Calendars, 1899 to 2050

 

  • Corresponding Jewish and Civil Dates, 1899 to 2050 
  • Weekly Torah and Haftarah Readings 
  • Jewish and Civil Holidays 
  • Fast Days and Rosh Hodesh,
  • Candle-Lighting Times for Selected American Cities
  • Great for Ancestry Research

The Jewish Calendar History and Inner Workings

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The Jewish Calendar History and Inner Workings, Third Edition

LIST OF TABLES

LIST OF FIGURES

FORWARD

CHAPTER 1    PRECURSORS TO THE JEWISH CALENDAR

CHAPTER 2    THE OBSERVATIONAL JEWISH CALENDAR

CHAPTER 3    THE CALCULATED JEWISH CALENDAR: MEASUREMENT OF TIME 

CHAPTER 4    THE CALCULATED JEWISH CALENDAR: THE MOLAD

CHAPTER 5    POSTPONEMENTS OF ROSH HASHANAH

CHAPTER 6    CALENDRICAL CYCLES

CHAPTER 7    THE NINETEEN-YEAR CYCLE

CHAPTER 8    JEWISH CALENDAR STATISTICS

CHAPTER 9    ERRORS AND REMEDIES

CHAPTER 10 FINDING T’KUFAH NISAN (THE VERNAL EQUINOX)

CHAPTER 11 CREATING JEWISH CALENDARS

FINAL EXAM

APPENDIX A Callippus’ Correction to the Calendar

APPENDIX B Molad Worksheet

APPENDIX C Year-Equivalent Values Within a Cycle

APPENDIX D Number of Accumulated Common and Leap Years by Year Within a Cycle

APPENDIX E Structure of the Jewish Year by Character

APPENDIX F Cycle-Equivalent Values

APPENDIX G Nineteen-Year Cycle Structures, Sets One Through Seven

APPENDIX H Nineteen-Year Cycle Structures, Sets Eight and Nine

APPENDIX I Some Useful Constants and Formulas

ANSWERS TO SELECTED CHAPTER EXERCISES

ANSWERS TO THE FINAL EXAM

INDEX


The Jewish Calendar: History and Inner Workings, Third Edition answers numerous questions, including:

  •      Why do blue moons and black moons have no meaning in the Jewish calendar?
  •      How is the start of the High Holy Day Rosh Hashanah computed? 
  •      Rosh Hashanah can only fall on four days of the week, why have the rabbis condensed seven days into four?
  •      The civil calendar is either 365 or 366-days long, why does the Jewish calendar need six different year lengths?
  •      Do moladot (Jewish-calendar lunations) repeat? If so, how often?
  •      The Julian calendar repeats every twenty-eight years, the Gregorian calendar every four hundred years, why does it take 689,472 years for the Jewish calendar to repeat?
  •      The Jewish and Gregorian calendars began together on October 15, 1582, will the two calendar ever match up again?
  •      The Jewish calendar’s nineteen-year cycles are aperiodic, can their appearance, disappearance, and reappearance be predicted?
  •     What are the Jewish calendar’s errors and what do they affect? Are there any ways to mitigate the errors?
  •     How do I construct my own a Jewish calendar?
  •     If I know the Jewish date, can I find the civil date?
  •     Is there such a thing as a perpetual Jewish calendar? If so, what does it look like?